Monday, June 22, 2015

Summer Reading Kick-Off!

2a
Now that the 48 Hour Book Challenge has pulled me out of my reading slump (and blogging hiatus) I am ready to throw myself into Summer Reading! First I'll start reading, and then I'll find some appropriate icon for this year.

Again, the goal is to start a book every day, from last Friday on. The side goal is to not have as many books left over as I did last year (I don't think I've finished them all). So I'm counting picture books! I'll count pamphlets if I have to! Maybe I'll count fortunes from fortune cookies...

This weekend gave me a comfortable lead, enough to cover the two days of driving. Bookjourney's It's Monday posts are still on hiatus (although she's back to reading and blogging, hooray to her!) but I'll check in with Teach Mentor Texts since I read a few kidlit books.

I miss my reading diary; I think I'll start that up again.

Finished this week:
  • Bless Her Dead Little Heart, Miranda James. This had a high body count.
  • Yonder Comes the Other End of Time, Suzette Haden Elgin. Cute as a banjo. I don't much like banjos, unfortunately.
  • A Matter For Men, David Gerrold. Very Heinlein-esq.
  • About that Night, Norah McClintock. Grim tale of murder and teens.
  • Forged in Blood 1, Lindsay Buroker. Lots of fun here.
  • MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood. This was was fun to read, but didn't pull me in.
  • The Jupiter Pirates: Hunt for the Hydra, Jason Fry. Only book I read that wasn't part of the read-a-thon. It's a Cybils finalist.

Bookmarks Moved this Week:
  • Dragon Prince, Melanie Rawn
  • The Winner's Curse, Marie Rutkoski
2015 Challenge Progress:
  1. Cybils 2014: 27/81. Still behind on completion ratio, but probably ahead on page count.
  2. Where Am I Reading?: 30/51.  On track for the year. Looking for Delaware, wouldn't mind a Hawaii or Indiania.
  3. Award Winning Book Challenge: I have apparently stopped reviewing books. But I've ticked off seven different awards. 
  4. Full House Challenge: 25/25. Not sure whether to find a new box or redo this one.
  5. Book Riot Read Harder: 18/24. I've done the easy ones. Need a young author, a translated text, and to understand what an indie press is. Lindsay Buroker self-publishes -- is she an indie press?
  6. Alphabetically Inclined:  I V X  Z still missing. 22/26
  7. Best of the Best 2012: 52/25.  I am stalled.
  8. Reading My Library: Library temporarily closed, so on hiatus.





Sunday, June 21, 2015

Ready! Set! Stop!

This is my official end post for the 48 Hour Book Challenge. I turned down a movie and a dinner out. (My kids made a delicious lasagna on Friday when they realized I would be providing NOTHING, so I did not suffer. Lasagna leftovers are even better than the first night). I'm not sure what movie I passed up, but I'm OK with that.

I spent 31 hours 45 minutes (including blogging hours). I think I spent almost two hours (1 hour 50 minutes) online, and I hopped about leaving comments on people's blogs so I felt all social. I almost took a look at twitter, but I decided social media could be taken too far.

I managed to finish a bunch of books that have been languishing in my currently-reading bag for almost a year! Honestly, I think I started some of them last summer. I also read the next Lindsay Buroker, who always writes fun books, and am in good shape to finish my audio book this week so I can get it back to the library.

Honestly, I was amazed at my ability to stick with books until the end. Usually I'm much more flibberty-jibbert like in my reading.

Books read:
MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood
Forged in Blood 1, Lindsay Buroker
Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis, Alexis Coe
Dragon Prince, Melanie Rawn
A Matter For Men, David Gerrold
Wyrd Sisters, Terry Pratchett (audio)
About That Night, Norah McClintock
Gulp, Mary Roach
Yonder Comes the Other End of Time, Suzette Haden Elgin
Bless Her Dead Little Heart, Miranda James

Books Finished:
MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood
Forged in Blood 1, Lindsay Buroker
Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis, Alexis Coe
About that Night, Norah McClintock
A Matter For Men, David Gerrold
Gulp, Mary Roach
Yonder Comes the Other End of Time, Suzette Haden Elgin
Bless Her Dear Little Heart, Miranda James

Friday, June 19, 2015

Mini-Reviews: 48 Hour Book Challenge


  • .
  • I don't know how many books I'll finish (I'll probably start start twenty five books or so) but just in case, I'll start out putting my reactions here:
      MaddAddam (MaddAddam, #3)
      Forged in Blood I (The Emperor's Edge, #6)
    1. MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood. This is the final book in the trilogy, and I enjoyed much more than I did the second. I'm getting old, so I've mostly forgotten the details of her world. This means I probably missed some jokes -- Atwood has a great sense of humor. The pages were easy to sink into, although the book itself never urged me to pick it up. I think this is because the book is about the world, and the characters, although clearly drawn, weren't all that interesting to me. The main character, Toby, spends so much of the time in jealous worry over her lover, and I keep wanting her to look around her -- the world was a fascinating place, no matter where Zeb was waving his penis. Once I realized my issues, it was easier to just look past Toby at the world around them, which was just as well, because that's where Atwood's attention was as well.
    2. Forged in Blood, Lindsay Buroker. My book club helped me discover this self-published author a few years ago, and I've been working my way through her work ever since. Her characters are quirky but real, and in this series she juggles her ensemble well, keeping us interested in each character while adding some to keep things changing. She does a great job with action sequences, and isn't afraid to have her characters make mistakes. This book is told from the perspective of the grim assassin that is half of the main love interest, and at first I thought that was a mistake -- his mysterious motives were a large part of the fun of the book. Buroker pulls it off, and I'm definitely looking forward to the final book in the series.
    3. Alice + Freda ForeverA Murder in Memphis, Alexis Coe. This 2014 Cybils finalist covers some history I don't know much about -- a murder in 1892, where a teenager attacked her girlfriend with a straight razor. Coe uses this to talk about the current ideas about gender roles, race, and homosexuality while also trying to give a sense of Alice's personality and motives. I think she did a better job with the former than the latter, but overall it seemed superficial to me. I hope that's because I'm an adult and the book is aimed at teen agersAlice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis
    4. About that Night. Norah McClintock is one of my favorite realistic YA authors. Her teens are modern but strong willed, with a sense of morals that they may struggle to live up to. I especially like her reluctance to tie things up with a bow -- in this mystery, no one has all the answers, even at the end. The reader gets to see more than the characters, because we check in with all the main characters, but even we have to figure out some things on our own. Young love is respected but not idealized, and death is very real.About That Night
    5. A Matter For Men, David Gerrold. I started this last summer, but it got very little traction and I barely made it past page fifty. But I'd like to clear out all my currently-readings, so I gave it another try, and it managed to keep me interested enough to see the end. Most of my interest came from seeing how close to Starship Troopers it could come -- clueless young man, women soldiers, very odd women (all the females who have an interest in sex), strange required military class at school, passive protagonist, giant invertebrate alien bad guys, long lectures on government and individual responsibility, and probably others that I'm skipping. I can't think of anyone I'd recommend it to, but it serves as a solid historical piece of science fiction, as much about the time it was published (early eighties) as the future it predicts.A Matter for Men 
    6. Gulp, Mary Roach. A fun book about how we digest, with an emphasis on the odd or amusing. It was rather slow reading, as the "ick" factor was rather high, but I like her preoccupation with appropriate names (and she's not afraid to go really juvenile, sniggering at a "Dr Brown" proctologist) and her willingness to ask silly questions and interview anyone (life-sentence convict known for smuggling goods up his bum). Did you know that the support ribbons for colon cancer used to be brown, but people objected and now they are blue? Appendix cancer ribbons are still amber.Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal
    7. Yonder Comes the Other End Of Time, Suzette Haden Elgin. I never got over the disappointment of finding that this book was set on a planet based on the West Virginia mountains, not actually in those mountains, and so of no use to me for my 50 States Challenge. It also had a lot of super-gendered stereotypes that tried my patience. Setting myself down, I managed to finish it, but I'm not inclined to seek out the other books about Coyote Jones (or about the Ozark planet, if there are any).Yonder Comes The Other End ...
    8. Bless Her Dead Little Heart, Miranda James. I grabbed this book from the library because it is set in Mississippi. It seemed of the murder-mystery-with-cats genre, but fell a bit short in both categories. No one solved the murder mystery; instead the murdered killed off all the other suspects before getting offed by her last intended victim. The cute cat, despite all its intelligence and door-opening skills, contributed nothing to the mystery. And the new pets featured on the cover never even got into the house! Unless I'm desperate for a Mississippi book next year I probably won't see out another Southern Ladies mystery. Bless Her Dead Little Heart (Southern Sisters, #1)

    Ready Set GO!

    It's appropriate that MotherReader's 48 Hour Book Challenge pulls me out of my protracted blogging slump, since it's that very challenge that got me started in publicly talking about my reading on this blog.

    Anyway, the challenge has started, and at 5:15 PM on Friday I shall join in. I've got books piled all around me and the cats on standby, so I'm ready to go! This year I'll track my time read, what books I open, and what books I finish. I'm not going to track my pages -- this is a low math weekend.

    I'll read for about 45 minutes, then record what I read, because I have a short attention span.

    Time read:
    6/19
    5:15  PM - 1:00 AM
    6/20
    7:15 AM - 12:15 PM
    1:15 PM - 2:30 PM
    2:35 PM - 11:35 PM
    6/21
    8:30 AM - 5:15
    ______________________

    31 hours 45 minutes (including blogging hours)


    Time Blogging & Blog Hopping:
    5 minutes
    15 minutes
    10 minutes
    10 minutes
    10 minutes
    5 minutes
    10 minutes
    5 minutes
    5 minutes
    10 minutes
    25 minutes
    ________________________________
    1 hour  50 minutes


    Books read:
    MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood
    Forged in Blood 1, Lindsay Buroker
    Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis, Alexis Coe
    Dragon Prince, Melanie Rawn
    A Matter For Men, David Gerrold
    Wyrd Sisters, Terry Pratchett (audio)
    About That Night, Norah McClintock
    Gulp, Mary Roach
    Yonder Comes the Other End of Time, Suzette Haden Elgin
    Bless Her Dead Little Heart, Miranda James

    Books Finished:
    MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood
    Forged in Blood 1, Lindsay Buroker
    Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis, Alexis Coe
    About that Night, Norah McClintock
    A Matter For Men, David Gerrold
    Gulp, Mary Roach
    Yonder Comes the Other End of Time, Suzette Haden Elgin
    Bless Her Dear Little Heart, Miranda James

    Monday, April 27, 2015

    Reading, Eyes Closed

    2a
    This week has been a lot about the books I want to have read but don't particularly enjoy reading. In particular, the finalists for the Cybils YA Fiction have been particularly hard on me. I prefer books where I can like the protagonists, so last week's I'll Give You the Sun dragged. This week the problem was that I worried so much about the main characters. It felt like I wanted to turn my eyes away from the pages, which really slows down my reading speed.

    Even the lighter books I turned to for relief had a lot of secondary embarrassment, so they weren't as much of a break as I hoped for. I think I'll go for some more action oriented light reading next week.

    Although the BookJourney meme is still on hiatus, I can still check in with the kidlit crowd at Teach Mentor Texts since a lot of what I read is kidlit or YA. Even the mainstream book All the Light I Cannot See is about teenagers so far:

    Monday: When I Was the Greatest, All the Light I Cannot See, The October CountryWildflower (completed), If I'm Jewish and You're Christian, What Are the Kids? (started)
    Tuesday: Pointe (started), All the Light I Cannot See, Rob Roy, Boys Wanted
    Wednesday: Pointe, All the Light I Cannot SeeWaiting For the Party (started)
    Thursday: Pointe, All the Light I Cannot See, Waiting For the Party, Boys Wanted
    Friday: Boys Wanted (completed), All the Light I Cannot See, Lost Enchantment
    Saturday: Pointe, The October Country, All the Light I Cannot See, Yonder Comes the Other End of Time
    Sunday: Pointe (completed), The October Country, Reading and Learning to ReadMaddAddam (started), All the Light I Cannot See

    Also finished: Forget-Me-Nots

    Started four, finished three, plus the book of poetry I've been reading before falling asleep.


    When I Was the GreatestPointeI read two Cybils books, because one was stolen by my eighth grader who forgot that he needed a book to read. So I read that one until the scene where I'm pretty sure things were going to go very badly, and then switched to Pointe, where things were dicey from the start. It's interesting to chart the books I'm sensitive to, because them correspond very closely to my own children. A few years ago it was hard for me to read about abused children. Now it's hard for me to read about teenagers tearing apart their lives. Pointe had a very believable narrator who has severe emotional problems as well as astonishing talent and potential. Watching her lie to herself about her past and what has been done to her, and what she does to herself in reaction, was excruciating. The last few chapters fixed many things, but they didn't ring as true as the previous pages describing the problems.

    WildflowerBoys WantedAll the Light We Cannot SeeThe books I finished in relief were much less traumatic. Bird's struggles to balance her crush with her promising music career were gentle and optimistic, while the inevitable date of the two narrators of Boys Wanted kept the suspense low while the humor bubbled away. I'm still not sure that the math worked out -- the number of boys who left was not actually that large, but the book was more about gentle exaggeration so I didn't worry my little head about it.

    MaddAddam (MaddAddam, #3)Yonder Comes The Other End of TimeI got All the Light We Cannot See back from the library, but again I expect bad stuff to happen in any book about World War II, so this one is not very relaxing either. I do love the quiet, evocative language that quickly evokes each character in their own tiny chapters. I made it through another chapter or so of Suzanne Elgin's book (remembering with sorry her recent death), but this one is a bit too much bad bureaucrats versus virtuous quirky types for me. And I started Atwood's MaddAddam, which I expect to enjoy but not be as amazed at as she expects, simply because I've read so much science fiction that has already thought about the situations she presents.

    Forget-Me-Nots: Poems to Learn by HeartFinally, in honor of April being poetry month I picked up Forget-Me-Nots from a library display. This is a collection of poems to learn by heart, which is a hobby of mine. Most of them did not strike me as ones I wanted to give permanent brain space to, however, and of the ones I liked, I had already memorized most of them. So at least it did not add to my to-do list! They were fun to read before falling asleep, though.

    2015 Challenge Progress:
    1. Cybils 2014: 8/81. Wow, I'm going very slowly. I need to get the ninth back from my son.
    2. Where Am I Reading?: 21/51.  Illinois, Wisconsin, Tennessee! Woot! I'm ahead for the year, for the next few days.
    3. Award Winning Book Challenge: I have apparently stopped reviewing books. But I've ticked off seven different awards. 
    4. Full House Challenge: 23/25. I very choosy about the "keeper" square. And the "like to visit" one.
    5. Book Riot Read Harder: 13/24. I've done the easy ones.
    6. Alphabetically Inclined:  I V X Y Z still missing. 21/26
    7. Best of the Best 2012: 52/25.  I am stalled.
    8. Reading My Library: Library temporarily closed, so on hiatus.





    Thursday, April 23, 2015

    Library Loot


    I'm officially going back to my library now. Well, still not my library, as that is under construction. I need a new picture though; it's got walls and everything now. A good choice -- although the open air plan was visually interesting, we were thinking it might not be so good for the books.

    But I'm going to the back-up library, and with the end of the Double Dog TBR challenge (which I NAILED this year, thank you very much) I can even check stuff out. I'm trying to stay sane about it, though; I can just about fit all my library books on one shelf, and I think that's a good plan.

    I had three books on hold, so I let myself grab one extra from the shelves, and then get a back-up Cybils because I'm falling far behind and I don't want to miss any time. And so this is really a reasonable amount of books for a week -- three kidlit books and two genre books, one a re-read.


    Wyrd SistersThe Penderwicks in SpringThe Monsters of Morley ManorGreenglass HouseMagic Breaks

    So far I've adored the Penderwick books, so I wanted to get my hands on the new one. And I enjoy the adventure and romance of Ilona Andrews books. Wyrd Sisters is for the Sword & Laser book club, and the Bruce Coville book is for my elementary book club; I'll put that aside until early May. And Greenglass House is a Cybils finalist for 2014.


    Sons of AnarchyNine Lives I'm enjoying grabbing CDs blindly to play while I clean my house, both because I like being surprised by music and because it keeps me from getting more books (remember, I can only check out as many things as my age). Both these look like good songs to clean the kitchen to.

    The Spirit WarSpirit's EndAnd I do love library ebooks. My son is gobbling up all the Rachel Aarons he can get his hands on, after he tasted the Vaginal Fantasy pick Fortune's Pawn by her pseudonym Rachel Bach. While we were waiting for his brother to get off the bus, he requested books four and five in this series, so I pulled out my phone and checked the library catalog before offering him either ebook or paper versions. He wanted ebooks so he'd have them instantly, and VOILA it was done. It's a wonderful world.
    badge-4

    I'll go sign in to Library Loot which is at The Captive Reader  this week to see what everyone else is getting.  Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. 

    Monday, April 20, 2015

    Why My Book Club Is Awesome

    2a
    Some facebook thing that I've now lost (found it!) gave a list of rules for a good book club, so I decided to compare this against my happy and thriving club. I also brought them up at out latest meeting, where we had a lot of fun, ate pizza, and talked about Doomsday Book by Connie Willis, recommended other books to each other, and planned our next books through the summer.

    1. Don't do it with your best friends.

    This might be a good idea if your friends are kind of lame. Probably not if your friends are awesome. Apparently the assumption is that your friends are a monolithic crowd who are more into the Kardashians than books anyway. This is happily not the case for me. I love having book clubs with my friends. And if I'm joining a new club, if many of the people in that book club don't become my friends, then we were doing it wrong. Of course, in my current book club, everyone is awesome. Especially my sister.

    2. Rotate who chooses the book.

    Our book club would hate this. We aren't into sudden surges of pressure. We do a lot better by throwing open the club for ideas every few months, picking some thing and trying not to remember who put them forward anyway.

    Also, I was deeply scarred by recommending a book in an old book club that was universally hated. I eventually left the state and tried not to give the members my forwarding address. So I do think you should know something about the books you put forward, so the group knows if they are taking a chance or not.

    3. Send out advance questions and pass them out at the book club.

    Seriously? I mean, this works well with my elementary book club, but does not seem like an informal way to relate to a book with your peers. If there is something you really want to talk about, write it on your hand so you remember it. But if people are reading, they aren't listening, so it kind of defeats the purpose, unless you have a hushed time for people to frantically read up on all the questions and then try to figure out what to say that makes them look good.

    At the kid book club, I write out some questions and put them on the tables at the library. Then I move around, pick up the questions and ask. It keeps things lively, gives the kids something to look at if they are distracted, and makes sure I think about the book enough beforehand to lead a discussion. But among my peers, I'm not doing as much corralling. 

    4. Do it at work.

    Actually, if I had a day-job this would probably be fun. I've done variations of this. My reasons did not reflect this article (no alcohol is a neutral, not a plus for me, and I don't want people worrying about looking smart. I want them smart enough already not to worry about it.). But daytime/lunch book clubs are fun.

    5. Call the writer.

    I think this might be inhibiting, actually. We're always interested in any contacts we've had with the writer (I've met a few, or emailed questions), but if the writer was actually THERE, and you didn't like the book for some reason, it might get awkward. We've read a book written by a friend of a member, which was bad enough when we complained about it, but at least if she was asked for feedback she could filter it through the good stuff we said as well.

    6. Build in social time.

    Yes, it's called eating time. Also arrival time -- at our club, we try not to start talking about the book until everyone arrives, so a lot of socializing happens at the beginning. Of course, the problem this addresses is that everyone forgets to talk about the book, and that's not a problem for a club whose members actually enjoy books and talking about books. Like, say, mine.

    7. Size matters.

    My club already deals with this -- we don't pick giant books, we look at our schedule and compare it to the books, and we'll read partial books if something hefty looks interesting. And we also do fun things like read a children's book for December, and have a movie for January on the assumption that those are crazy times for most people anyway.  The movie idea is especially great; we usually pick something that has some literary connection and meet on Sunday afternoon at the house with the biggest TV. Great meetings: that movie about a book club, Joss Whedon's Much Ado About Nothing, (which led to a later book club where we read a Shakespeare play out loud), Sabrina where we all watched the old version at home and than watched the Harrison Ford one together and had a lively lunch comparing them.  

    8. Give ample time between sessions.

    How many clubs meet more often than once a month anyway? Who are these people, and why are they so easily distracted by TV? We had a great time picturing how this could go wrong -- have a club that spontaneously calls a meeting whenever someone finishes a book (RING -- the BOOK PHONE is calling!). Probably at least once a day.

    Seriously, is this a problem -- do most people start a book club and plan to meet every third day or weekly? And then wonder why attendance drops like a rock? Maybe this would be a good theme for a play group -- meet weekly and talk picture books. Or if you are doing a chapter by chapter read of something that everyone is passionate about, but you'd better have a big crowd so you can take turns flaking. If your other concerns are how distracting Kardashian talk is at your meetings I think you are deluding yourself.

    9. Have a cell-phone bowl (like a key party).

    Again, as in problem number 1, I would fix this with a better grade of friends. If your book club members are instagramming the dip instead of book clubbing, forget to send them the email with the next meeting's location. Unless it's that time I made the sun-pastry tzitziki dip, in which case that was completely appropriate behavior. My club found this hilarious, but maybe we just aren't important enough for this to be a problem.

    10. Venture into nonfiction.

    We totally do this. Because we're so smart. I do think this one is a good idea.

    My book club has only one rule, and we are very strict about it: You can't use not reading the book as an excuse not to come. We find it is often interesting to have an outsider opinion, so you don't have to sit in isolation while everyone else discusses the book -- go ahead and have opinions anyway. You can skip if you have other obligations, if you are feeling anti-social, if you just don't want to come, and maybe if you are loving the book and can't bear to have it spoiled, but don't avoid us just because you didn't want to read this month's selection.

    Speaking of reading, what have I read this week? I'm going to ignore the month or so I skipped blogging. I like keeping a book diary though, so I can see what I've been up to:

    Monday: Tell the Wolves I'm Home, I'll Give You the Sun, The October Country, Darkship Thieves (completed), Honor's Knight (completed)
    Tuesday: When I Was the Greatest (started), The October CountryI'll Give You the Sun, Life After Life
    Wednesday: Life After Life (finished), I'll Give You the Sun, The October Country, Codex Born
    Thursday: Codex BornMatilda (started, finished), I'll Give You the Sun
    Friday: I'll Give You the Sun (finished), Burn For Me (started), The October Country, Reading and Learning to Read
    Saturday: Burn For Me (finished)
    Sunday: When I Was the Greatest,  The October Country, All the Light I Cannot See, About Last Night


    Started three, finished six. The direction is good! Currently reading seventeen books. I'd like to get that down to about ten. (It will never get below that, due to my habits of having some books I only read at certain times, and also needing to have books on my NOOK, phone, car, etc.)

    Honor's Knight (Paradox, #2)DarkShip ThievesI finished up last month's Vaginal Fantasy Picks. Well, the sequel to one pick (Honor's Knight) and then the alt pick. I'm having a lot of fun with Rachel Bach's series; my older son has finished it and was very happy when I brought home her fantasy stuff from the library. It's got a smart, interesting woman solving the universe's problems with integrity, humor and space guns. Perfect for me. Darkship Thieves was more of a mixed bag -- it is clearly an homage to Heinlein's Friday with both the good and the bad that implies. The main character has enhanced powers and a mixed expression of sexuality; any book that involves grown women using the term "Daddy" is going to leave me cold a lot of the time.

    Life After LifeI heard many raves about Life After Life, but I found it a bit tick-boxy. It's like the author had a list of things and issues to make the character go through -- rape?  check. Domestic abuse? Check. Hitler's buddy? check. And the questions about individual choice and history were raised much more interestingly in Jo Walton's My Real Children. Each page was easy to turn, but I had no problems putting the book down and a lot of inertia to pick it back up.

    I'll Give You the SunMatildaMatilda was a fun pick for the school book club. I liked how Matilda and her friends are the smart, moral ones while all the adults are the base, foolish ones. I used that as an excuse to make the kids run the discussion as well as to cover the idea of transgressive texts. It was a good antidote to the teen read I'll Give You the Sun which had two astonishingly selfish and cruel twins, who loved each other heaps but had no qualms about selling each other out at the smallest provocation. Really, both were the kinds of kids who would eat the last two cookies off the plate and tell their siblings there were none left, unless the cookies had nuts or something they didn't like. I wish the endings didn't have them both in romantic relationships, because their partners are in for a rough time, and those two really need to spend some time with themselves.

    Burn for Me (Hidden Legacy, #1)Ilona Andrews writes books about witty and capable women who get together with superpowered men in a fun and diverting way. This worked well doing what the box said it would do, and I'll keep an eye out for the sequel. I bet my high school son would like it as well.

    Codex Born (Magic Ex Libris, #2)All the Light We Cannot SeeAbout That NightTell the Wolves I'm HomeBooks whose bookmarks moved included Tell the Wolves I'm Home which is beautifully written and I enjoy savoring it, but I suspect there are hard times ahead for the narrator so I'm in to hurry to get through it. About That Night is mystery that doesn't have a character to grab me (like the author's Dooley) so I read a little bit and then put it down. Codex Born will probably grab me soon, but right now I keep losing it around the house -- it spent several days on the dryer while I searched for it. And my NOOK's power issues keep me from binging on All the Light I Cannot See, which was sad when the library made it go poof. I have it back again now.



    If I finish this in time, I'll report in to Teach Mentor Texts about my readings. Book Journey is on hiatus after a tragedy.

    2015 Challenge Progress:
    1. Cybils 2014: 7/81. Wow, I'm going very slowly. I just had the eighth stolen by my eighth grader, so I guess I'll start a different one.
    2. Where Am I Reading?: 18/51.  Lots of unfortunate duplicates.
    3. Award Winning Book Challenge: I have apparently stopped reviewing books. But I've ticked off seven different awards. 
    4. Full House Challenge: 22/25. I love this kind of thing.
    5. Book Riot Read Harder: 13/24. I've done the easy ones.
    6. Alphabetically Inclined:  I V X Y Z still missing. 21/26
    7. Best of the Best 2012: 52/25.  I am stalled.
    8. Reading My Library: Library temporarily closed, so on hiatus.