Monday, September 1, 2014

High Tide

2a
I've had a fun month and a half of starting books every morning, adding them to by book bag, and then reading whatever I like all day. Next morning I start something new.

Now it's time to start shrinking that book bag, starting on Thursday. That will (I hope) be the start of shrinking my currently-reading pile.

The library helped focus me a bit this week, and I worked at finishing the stuff I couldn't renew. Also, I'm in a few book clubs and they also have some connection to a calendar. So I did manage to finish a few things this week, in addition to starting seven more books.

I'm off to sign up to see what everyone else is reading lately at bookjourney's and Teach Mentor Texts lists:
  • The Missing, Shiloh Walker. This was a good contrast to the Vaginal Fantasy pick, because the HEA couple meets as kids, fall apart, but aren't complete idiots about it. The paranormal stuff was done well.
  • Black Butler, Vol 2. Yana Toboso. I'm continuing this series recommended by my elementary book club, but I still need better manga muscles. Reading right to left is a strain.
  • Quatrain, Sharon Shinn. I'm a huge Shinn fan and really liked this collection of four stories in four of her different settings.
  • Love, Stargirl, Jerry Spinelli. Stargirl is such a smart kid; I have no idea why she invested so much of her emotions in that boy from Arizona.
  • Clean Sweep, Ilona Andrews. Fun book with an interesting innkeeper protagonist.
  • The Invasion, Katherine A. Applegate. I'm glad I got to read an Animorph book for the Sword and Laser Kids group.
  • Mrs Pollifax Pursued, Dorothy Gilman. I really like how Mrs. Pollifax's marriage hasn't slowed her down at all.
  • The Education of Madeline, Beth Williamson. This was a bit disappointing because the characters thought they were clever but acted like morons. The sex was adventurous, though.
  • The Lions of al-Rassan, Guy Gavriel Kay. Very powerful and gripping after I got about fifty pages in.
  • Captain Marvel, Vol. 1: In Pursuit of Flight, Kelly Sue Deconnick. A Cybils YA pick that I liked enough to get the next volume for.
What am I currently reading? In good news, I think I finished more books than I started last week. I'm still reading about a month's worth of books, though. Most of my currently reading list is now on  GOODREADS.
  • Magic City: Recent Spells, Paula Guran, ed. I already added an author to my "to read" list from this anthology. p.55
  • He, She, and It. Marge Piercy. I hope to get more androids soon. p.101
  • Always, Abigail, Nancy J. Cavanaugh. Silly girl's diary of lists. p. 51
  • About That Night, Norah McClintock.  No change. p. 53.
  • Affliction, Laurell K. Hamilton. No change. p.53.
  • Rogue, Michael Z. Williamson.  No change. p. 154.
  • Protector, C.J. Cherryh.  No change. p. 67
  • Wildflower, Alecia Whitaker.No change. p. 51 16%
  • Tell the Wolves I'm Home, Carol Rifka Brunt. No change.
  • The 14 Fibs of Gregory K, Greg Pincus. No change. p.55
  • Reading in the Wild, Donalyn Miller. No change. p.1
  • Breakfast on Mars, ed. Rebecca Stern. No change.  p.1
  • The Fault in Our Stars, John Green. No change. p.64
  • Serafina's Promise, Ann E. Berg. Our family survived the flood.  p. 103
  • Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo, Obert Skye. One more person has joined the group, and he might know how to get to Foo. p. 230
  • Divergent, Veronica Roth. No change.  p.61
  • Gregor the Overlander, Suzanne Collins. No change. p.69
  • Yonder Comes the Other End of Time, Suzette Elgin. No change. p.113
  • Shards of Time, Lynn Flewelling. No change. p.35
  • The Goblin Emperor, Katherine Addison. My kid read this and liked it. He has a new NOOK.
  • Cathedral of the Wild, Boyd Varty. No change. p.107
  • Tinker, Wen Spencer. Just got it back. Child has finished reading the sequel. No change. p.310
  • The Golden Leopard, Lynn Kerstan. Wow, they got married! I did not see that coming. p. 234.
  • Inkheart, Cornelia Funke. No change. p. 260
  • The Son of Neptune, Rick Riordan. No change. p.256
Reading intermittently, and deliberately slowly. These never change much:
  • The Jury, Stephen Adler.  Gripping account of a jury's progress on a capital case.  p. 36.
  • Reading and Learning to Read, Jo Anne Vacca. More meta about learning to read. p.24.
  • Nerds, Michael Buckley. Life is hard for villains. Also, there is a secret department in the school. p.54.
  • Out to Canaan, Jan Karon. Tiny sections means this one goes very slowly. A baseball game and a property sale. p.251.
  • The Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens. We hear an amusing story from somebody or another. p. 755.
What's up next?  I think I'll move the planning to Mondays rather than library days, since it's not like I usually have space to read what I've just picked up anyway. Also, I need to start weaning myself of my book-a-day start rate:

Monday: Boxers & Saints (Cybils)
Tuesday: Growing Up Brave  ( for parenting reasons)
Wednesday: Anna of Byzantium (my book)
Thursday: Into the Forest (for book club, which has just been postponed)
Saturday: Ultra (Cybils)

NOOK books: He, She, and It is moving very slowly, but if I finish it I'll move on to The Fourteenth Goldfish. That will bump one of the above books off the list; probably Into the Forest.

2014 Challenge Progress:
  1. Cybils: 53/77. No change. I need to finish some more books! I need more than one a week.
  2. Where Am I Reading? 31/51. Got Colorado. Almost got a Connecticut. Currently reading an Indiana, and I think an Alaska. 
  3. Alphabetically Inclined: 19/26. Read a Q book. Still need an E, I, J,  V, X, Y, and Z.
  4. What's In a Name?: 7/7. Still have to review everything. Ha!
  5. Book Bingo: Fifteen boxes into square 2.
  6. Gentle Spectrum Challenge: Got all the colors. Need a punny book.
  7. Small Fry Safari: 7/8. No change. Still need something precious.
  8. PoC Speculative Fiction 16/5:  I made it to Post-Apocalyptic survivor! I want to get deep into here though, because I'm not confident on some of my entries.
  9. Big Books: 1. Never finishing things makes this hard.
  10. Best of the Best 2012: 52/25.  I am stalled.
  11. Reading My Library: Library temporarily closed, so on hiatus.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Cybils Poetry Books

Cybils2013SmallPoetry is a tough category, because so many children's picture books rhyme. Are they all poems? When does a picture book become an illustrated poem? And it's hard for me to drag along the rest of my family -- a few years ago I'd sneak in a poem each night as part of our reading, but somehow the habit of reading with my kids at night has fallen away. We read in our separate beds, and make sure we overlap at least one book a month with our family book club (a good excuse to go out and eat sushi!).


So I'm glad I'm not a judge. I have almost no experience of kids liking poetry. I know the Cybils tries to pair kid appeal with adult assessments of quality, and on that basis I'd have have to give the nod to Follow Follow although my favorite read of these books was Poems to Learn By Heart. Both my kids vote for Follow Follow but I barely count that since they refused to read most of the other books.

I now peek at the winner and it was: Forest Has a Song.
  1. Follow Follow: A Book of Reverso Poems, Marilyn Singer. I read this last year when it came out -- my family is a big fan of Reverso poems. We liked it, but without the wild enthusiasm of the first book.
  2. Forest Has a Song: Poems, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater. Nice enough, but more a picture book than a poetry collection.
  3. Poems to Learn by Heart, Caroline Kennedy. I like learning poems by heart, although sadly I've never convinced my kids to try it. In fact, they tend to recoil if I start to recite. But I enjoyed seeing some old favorites (some of which I know by heart) and I even added a few to my poetry notebook.
  4. Pug: And Other Animal Poems, Valerie Worth. Picture book with nice illustrations.
  5. The Pet Project: Cute and Cuddly Vicious Verses, Lisa Wheeler. A sa, almost tragic story of a girl afraid to love, frightened by the idea of imperfections. It ends with the child's commitment to loneliness and isolation. But I liked the kitten poem, except for the last line -- I say yes to the contradictions, and open my heart to joy and pain. The poet backs away.
  6. What the Heart Knows: Chants, Charms, and Blessings, Joyce Sidman. I liked the idea, but none of the poems themselves spoke to me. I found nothing I wanted to commit to memory.
  7. When Thunder Comes: Poems for Civil Rights Leaders, J. Patrick Lewis. This felt more like a picture book about the various leaders.

Friday, August 29, 2014

School Bells Warming Up


I actually made two trips to my library this week, due to an unexpected emergency. Well, for some definitions of emergency, in this case it means "mentioning to my nephew that his DVD had arrived." I tried to resist my hold shelf, but was unsuccessful. I know this is silly, because I can't read anything I just checked out because I'm going to be so busy reading the stuff that is almost due, but the books sang so sweetly...

Of course, I had to go back again on my regular library day, and by then I had another book on hold. And the display by the self-checkout was books about reading, which are irresistible to me. By the way, that picture is still my main library, but I actually went to my backup library, which has walls. And books.

Anyway, on my first trip to the library I got:
Anubis Speaks!TemplarWar Brothers
All three are Cybils books, but the first is a reread because our family book club picked it.

And on my second trip I got:
Slow Reading in A Hurried AgeCaptain MarvelFury of the DemonStories of your Life and Others
All just because they look like fun. The reading book is because I love reading about reading, and the next two are sequels to books I liked. Oh, that last one is an e-book, and the next Sword and Laser pick.

Also, I found myself with an hour to spare in a mall with a book store. So I got a couple of books, and then found the NOOKs on sale, so I replaced my older son's broken one. Which meant I had to buy some online books because it comes with a $5 credit. I have to say that their online gift certificate system is very annoying. It seems to go for the biggest card first, but only lets you have three in the system at a time, which means that it's easy to get stuck with several tiny amounts clogging up your account. I decided the only thing to do was to blow through all my current gift cards and start fresh.
The Lies of Locke LamoraCodex Born: (Magic Ex Libris: Book Two)
I really wanted to buy an Elizabeth Bear book, but the silly store was out. So I got a book by her boyfriend instead. I think I'll make my kid read it to see if I'll like it. And Codex Born is a book about books, so I'm a natural.

Forged in Blood II (The Emperor's Edge Final Book)EncryptedVeronica Mars: The Thousand Dollar Tan LineCivil ContractThe Novels of Alexander the Great: Fire from Heaven, The Persian Boy, and Funeral Games

This is the last week of my start-a-book-a-day summer fiesta. Just as well -- even if I read a book a day this week, I will still fall behind, since I brought home six seven library books and seven personal books.  I think I'll wean myself off next week by starting a book every other day, and then every third day, until finally I'm down to only reading ten or so books at once. That's what normal people do, right?

Friday: Quatrain (my book)
Saturday: Magic City (library book, for fun) My 10th grader liked these short stories.
Sunday:  Black Butler 2 (recommended by book club). Also enjoyed by 10th grader.
Monday: Boxers & Saints (Cybils)
Tuesday:  Growing Up Brave  (library book, for fun)
Wednesday: Anna of Byzantium (my book)
Thursday: Into the Forest (for book club, which I just realized I'm going to miss)


badge-4So I currently have 46 books out on my library card, which is actually a lot, right?

 I'll go sign in to Library Loot which is at The Captive Reader this week to see what everyone else is getting.  Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. 

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Just For Me

midnightcrossroadReading Charlaine Harris's Midnight Crossroad was a delightful experience for me, but I'm not sure if everyone else could appreciate it. It shows off her usual strengths -- realistically drawn characters that clearly inhabit their settings, a pleasantly diverse group that provide interesting viewpoints on each other, and dialogue that works to advance the plot, illustrate character, and amuse the reader.

The mystery itself doesn't seem that important -- this is a book about exploring the small town Harris imagines on the crossroads of Texas state highways, with a group of people unexpectedly ready to band together both because of their similarities and against the bad guys. But there's not much action -- someone asked me what it was about when I was a good chunk in and I really had no answer yet.

But I didn't care, because the other thing this book had going for it was a huge reunion of characters from all across Harris's work.  We move into the town with Manfred Bernardo, the psychic who worked with Harper Connolly several times in her series. His landlord is Bobo Winthrop, young friend of Lily Bard in her mystery series. The cop who comes to deal with the mystery is Aurora Teagarden's old flame Arthur. It makes me want to tear through all her work to see if I'm missing any other links or characters. And it means I know lots of secret stuff about everyone -- I know what went wrong with Arthur's marriages. I know about Bobo's family, even his teen-age fantasies. I've seen Manfred with this grandmother.

I wish Harris had tipped this a bit more, because sometimes I wondered if I was supposed to know all this. Was she reusing names, or really reusing characters? Who did I miss from Sookie Stackhouse -- I'm sure there was someone. And all these worlds aren't really in the same place, are they? So it was a bit disconcerting. Overall, I really like the intersections, but I wonder how the book would read to someone new to this author, or even just someone who hadn't tracked down all her work over the past decade or so.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Rearranging and Hoarding

2a
I have to say I'm really enjoying this idea of starting a new book every day -- no pressure to ever finish anything. It's very freeing. Of course it means that I haven't touched many of the books I'm currently reading, but I can tell you where I am in the stories!

It's just as well that I'm ending this when school starts on the 2nd. Then I should probably have a finish two before starting one policy to save me from having to buy a currently-reading bookcase.

Anyway, since I'm a heavy library user, due dates tend to focus my attention a bit. I keep an eye on books that the library will call home so they stay on the top of the book bag; sadly books I buy tend to float to the bottom even if they are the ones I really hunger for.

 I'm off to sign up to see what everyone else is reading lately at bookjourney's and Teach Mentor Texts lists:
  • The Return of Zita the Spacegirl, Ben Hatke. I've been a fan since the first one, and I was glad to see that the dark second installment is replaced with the action-packed final reel. I think these would be better read closer together because I had forgotten some of the people there for the big reunion scenes.
  • World After, Susan Ee. Another sequel (boy, these Cybils sure add to my reading list, with the finalists every year and then the new authors added to my must-read list). 
  • Bad Machinery Vol II: The Case of the Good Boy, John Allison. I wasn't sure if the Cybils nomination was for the first or second book, so I compromised by getting both. Fun reads.
  • Games of Command, Linnea Sinclair. This was the alt-alt book for Vaginal Fantasy this month, and since it looked like a long wait to get the real books I tried it out. I liked the world building, but the romance didn't really work for me.
  • Moonday, Adam Rex. Nicely surreal picture book about a family dealing with the moon parking itself in their backyard. My favorite page was the yawn that bounces around the block before returning to our narrator.
What am I currently reading?  Well, as I started another seven books last week and finished four, this list gets longer and longer. That's exactly what I said last week, by the way, so there's a definite delightfully insane trend. Almost half of my currently reading list is now on  GOODREADS.
  • The Education of Madeline, Beth Williamson. The main characters seem to be lacking in common sense. p. 208.
  • About That Night, Norah McClintock. This looks like a murder mystery, and I have high hopes from the author of the Dooley books. p. 53.
  • Affliction, Laurell K. Hamilton. The first few chapters have a little bit of plot and a lot of very heavy handed exposition and review. Probably necessary, but it makes the dialogue hilariously unlikely. p.53.
  • Clean Sweep, Ilona Andrews. Prologues and introductions always make for a slow start. p.1.
  • Rogue, Michael Z. Williamson. Military SF. p. 154.
  • The Missing, Shiloh Walker. Old book from my TBR list. p. 63.
  • Protector, C.J. Cherryh. The first three chapters reminded me of where we are in the story. No change. p. 67
  • Wildflower, Alecia Whitaker. Teenage girl becomes a singing sensation. No change. 16%
  • The Invasion (Animorphs), Katherine Applegate. Right after I started this my kid stole it to review for the Sword and Laser Kids podcast. p.154
  • Tell the Wolves I'm Home, Carol Rifka Brunt. I'm still on the first page, so this hardly counts.
  • The 14 Fibs of Gregory K, Greg Pincus. Yes, this will be a very painful read for me, as the kid makes obvious mistakes and panics about failing. p.55
  • Reading in the Wild, Donalyn Miller. A book about encouraging people to read independently. Re-inspiring me to try to start a book club at our local junior high. No change. p.1
  • Breakfast on Mars, ed. Rebecca Stern. A Cybils finalist. This is a book of ESSAYS! I love it, and I bet I cannot get my boys to try it. I thought it was a cooking book. No change.  p.1
  • The Fault in Our Stars, John Green. Not really in the mood for a death book. No change. p.64
  • Serafina's Promise, Ann E. Berg. No change.  p.99
  • Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo, Obert Skye. I believe we have assembled to imporatnat characters, and it is time to head for Foo.  No change. p.102
  • Divergent, Veronica Roth. No change.  p.61
  • Love, Stargirl, Jerry Spinelli. No change. p.52
  • Gregor the Overlander, Suzanne Collins. No change. p.69
  • The Lions of al-Rassan, Guy Gabriel Kay. Wow, history is sure mean, even when it's a fantasy history. p. 414.
  • Yonder Comes the Other End of Time, Suzette Elgin. No change. p.113
  • Shards of Time, Lynn Flewelling. No change. p.35
  • The Goblin Emperor, Katherine Addison. I really miss the hardback I had that mysteriously vanished. Still reading on my NOOK, but I have no idea how to track progress.
  • Cathedral of the Wild, Boyd Varty. No change. p.107
  • Tinker, Wen Spencer. Just got it back. Child is now reading the sequel. No change. p.310
  • The Golden Leopard, Lynn Kerstan. The poor guy is really learning the lesson of the Boy Who Cried Wolf and how a reputation is more precious than gold. p. 153.
  • Inkheart, Cornelia Funke. No change. p. 260
  • The Son of Neptune, Rick Riordan. p.256
Reading intermittently, and deliberately slowly. These never change much:
  • The Jury, Stephen Adler. The book will show why juries are important but how we are doing them wrong. No change. p. 3.
  • Reading and Learning to Read, Jo Anne Vacca. Two views on introducing reading -- phonic based and immersion. p.14.
  • Nerds, Michael Buckley. Our hero has gotten braces and lost his friends and his life. No change. p.34.
  • Out to Canaan, Jan Karon. Tiny sections means this one goes very slowly. A funeral and some reminiscing. No change. p.236.
  • The Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens. Yay -- they will leave the prison. Very dull insightful commentary on the silliness of legal proceedings. No change. p. 737.
What's up next? I plan that on Thursdays, but mostly more library books. This will be so for several more weeks at least.

2014 Challenge Progress:
  1. Cybils: 52/77. No change. I haven't finished anything!  
  2. Where Am I Reading? 30/51. Currently reading a Colorado, an Indiana, and I think an Alaska. 
  3. Alphabetically Inclined: 18/26. OK, clearly I'm going to have to explicitly draw from my shelves.  I need an E, I, and J. Q, V, X, Y, and Z.
  4. What's In a Name?: 7/7. Still have to review everything. Ha!
  5. Book Bingo: Fifteen boxes into square 2.
  6. Gentle Spectrum Challenge: Got all the colors. Need a punny book.
  7. Small Fry Safari: 7/8. No change. Still need something precious.
  8. PoC Speculative Fiction 13/5:  World After counts, and I decided to count Bad Machinery together as one, since it's an ensemble cast with a PoC member.
  9. Big Books: 1. Never finishing things makes this hard.
  10. Best of the Best 2012: 52/25.  I am stalled.
  11. Reading My Library: Library temporarily closed, so on hiatus.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Cybils Elementary & Middle Grade Graphic Novel Finalists

www.cybils.comI called to me all the Cybils Early Chapter Book finalists from my excellent library, which has almost everything anyone could want. King County Library System Rocks! And if occasionally I think of something they don't have, they either find it for me somewhere else or else get it for me because I'm special. Just like everyone else.

You wouldn't tell it from my reviews, but I'm actually doing fairly well on my Cybils Finalist Challenge -- I think I'm at 52 books (I don't do the apps). If I ever finish early I'll start a lifetime Challenge to catch up the years before I started doing this -- I think I started with the 2010 list but they started in 2006.

If I haven't messed them up, the book titles below should be Amazon links that benefit the Cybils, so if anyone wants to buy these books, use that.

Bluffton: My Summers with Buster Keaton, Matt Phelan. The water color illustrations give this a gentle, old-time feeling that suits the optimistic story of a small town boy intersecting with the exotic Buster Keaton. Even as we watch the boy struggling against the conformity of his life the love and affection his family and friends show him correctly predict that he'll find happiness. It held my middle school boy's attention.

 Hereville: How Mirka Met a Meteorite, Barry Deutsch. This felt a bit "lesson-y" to me -- Mirka must learn to conform more to her gender role but without giving up her dreams. Except when her dreams are foolish (and there are foolish dreams -- wanting to be great without wanting to work for it, for example). Mirka is saved by her clever siblings instead of by herself, but then she did save them all at the start of the book.

Both boys read it and seemed happy enough. X was more positive than me.

 March Book 1, John Lewis. This was very powerful, and also accessible to me. I don't know much about this part of history so I liked reading about a memoir that gave a feel for how people felt and acted.

X thought it was all right; P never picked it up.

 Monster on the Hill, Rob Harrell. This was jolly, a bit gory, and a lot of fun. The switches between sympathizing with the people and the monsters was well done, and the bright colors and active panel sizes matched the story and characters well. This was a lot of fun and unexpectedly emotionally powerful.

Both kids ate it up.

  Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales: Donner Dinner Party Nathan Hale. Both X and I enjoy the Nathan Hale books, swallowing the historical medicine easily with the spoonful of grim humor and careful drawings. This story is especially dark, with death piled upon death and no escape for the young or likable.

I think P skipped it; probably just as well. X was an enthusiast; in fact I just brought home one about WWI and he's gobbling it up.

Squish #5: Game On!,  Jennifer L. Holm. Fun, and I've been been meaning to try these. I don't think starting with #5 made me lose much -- the relationships seem pretty straightforward and the story likewise. Pleasant but not lingering.

Both boys zipped through this. I tried to interest the beginning reader but he didn't bite.

The Lost Boy, Greg Ruth. I was impressed by how spooky this story was -- I think it's right on the border between this category and the older one. The drawing was also impressive, although the darkness made it hard for my barely-graphically-literate eyes to keep track of the characters. This is all me -- I have a feeble visual memory and tend to have huge troubles distinguishing characters in comics, which my children find highly amusing.

I'm not sure if the junior high boy finished this, but the high schooler liked it.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Aiming For Sanity (But Missing)


My regular library continues to lack walls (and books) so I trundled along to the back-up library with the three boys. The girl is off hosting her Japanese exchange friend, so she's been busy seeing the sights of Seattle while I stay home with the boys and relax into the last weeks of summer vacation.

I have carefully scheduled as little as possible into these days, to ensure we have time to laze about reading, play too many hours of video games, and stare into the refrigerator hoping that something will inspire us into eating it.
Good times!

I had three books on my hold shelf, plus the missing House of Anubis DVD from last week. Taking its appearance as a Sign From Above, I brought it home and just hope the previous one shows up before this one comes due.

The Book ThiefSteadfastTreaties, Trenches, Mud, and BloodHe, She, and It

Book Thief was recommended by my elementary school book club. I'm slowly realizing that I'm not going to finish their list of summer recommendations, since I think there are about twenty left and summer for me ends on September 3rd. Oops. Well, being late has never particularly troubled me, so I shall continue on.  

Steadfast is a bit of a guilty pleasure for me; it's not Jack Campbell's best writing (those would be the Moon books he wrote as Jack Hemry) but I really like the story and the characters, so I just ignore the words and watch the movie in my head.

Nathan Hales' Treaties, Trenches, Mud and Blood is the next in his series of historical graphic novels, which I learned about through the Cybils and now continue to seek out on my own. It was immediately confiscated by the 10th grader, so he's doing something right.

The August pick for the Vaginal Fantasy is Marge Piercy's He, She, and It, so I'm glad my reserve of the ebook came in. Lucky for me the discussion is delayed until the first week of September, so I might have time to finish it.

Summer is still going, so I'm still doing my start-a-book-a-day. (I don't finish a book a day, so my currently-reading stack is ENORMOUS.)  I'm concentrating on my library books, hoping to bring it down to a reasonable pile by the end of September. I turned in more than I checked out today, so that's a good sign, right? I must say, planning this in advance makes me feel like I'm in control, and then I trip on the mountain that is my currently-reading bag, and I see what an illusion that is.

Friday: The Return of Zita the Spacegirl (library book, sequel)
Saturday: Rogue (my book)
Sunday:  Clean Sweep (library, for fun)
Monday: Captain Marvel : In Pursuit of Flight (library, Cybils)
Tuesday: Mrs Pollifax, Pursued  (library book, for fun)
Wednesday: Always Abigail, Nancy J. Cavanaugh (my book, because I WON IT)
Thursday: Growing Up Brave  (library book, for fun)

He, She, and It
is waiting on my ebook for me, so at least one of these will get bumped.

badge-4So I currently have 43 books out on my library card, which is better than last week.

 I'll go sign in to Library Loot which is at Silly Little Mischief this week to see what everyone else is getting.  Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week.